The $50,000 Starbucks Latte Habit

Do you ever think that, since it’s “only” $4 for a Starbucks latte, you’re not really throwing your money away?  I mean, $4 for a cup of coffee is nothing compared to your brand new $30,000 car.  Or $50,000 in student loan debt.  Or your $250,000 mortgage.  Right?  What’s another $4?

In the example I am about to share, a $4 Starbucks latte habit over the next decade costs your future self over $50,000.

Before you get your calculator and tell me I am wrong, follow along and I will show you.  This […]

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How to Build A Website Quickly and Inexpensively

Hey there, Lacking Cents reader!  We are about a dozen posts in, and it’s about time I finally document for you how I created this website and blog in case you want to start your own blogging journey.

We have grown to nearly 3,000 Twitter and 1,000 Instagram followers since launching just two months ago, and I believe our growing readership is directly related to the incredible tools that allow me to create and maintain this website.  Our server has been spectacular (never a second of down time!), the theme has been enjoyable to customize, and WordPress is without a […]

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2017-05-05T12:19:55+00:00 April 28, 2017 6:00 am|Categories: Featured, Recommendations, Website Tips|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

4 Ways Dave Ramsey’s Baby Steps Miss the Mark

Since you’re reading a blog about personal finance, there’s a good chance you have heard of Dave Ramsey and maybe even follow some of his financial advice. Much of it is very helpful, simple advice that working adults managing their own finances should know.

If you are not familiar with Dave Ramsey, he hosts a syndicated radio show on personal finance and is the author of several books, including The Total Money Makeover.  The show instills his Christian beliefs and a very very anti-debt message.  In fact, he is so anti-debt that some of his advice misses several basic financial perks that leave individuals better […]

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An Emergency Fund is Essential For Our Family

Job loss. Unexpected illness or injury.  Theft.

When my family first decided to open an emergency fund, it was to protect ourselves against these major unexpected financial expenses.  While that continues to be a reason we maintain an emergency fund, it is the smaller unexpected expenses that make this account essential to us.

As I outlined in a separate article, we learned to better understand our monthly expenses and know approximately how much we spend in a typical month.  This is important to us because part of our paycheck goes to monthly expenses and the rest is automatically invested or put toward our mortgage.  In order to have fairly stable monthly […]

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2017-04-17T11:10:24+00:00 March 21, 2017 7:08 am|Categories: Budgeting, Featured|Tags: , |9 Comments

How We Paid Off Over $50K in Student Loans A Decade Early

Ok fellow Millennials.  Let’s talk student loan debt.  I can sense the cringing already.  But hey, you clicked on this article voluntarily…so you must be somewhat okay talking about it.

First let’s throw out some common talking points — some objective and others more subjective.  Student loan debt is crushing young people in the U.S. to the tune of $1.3 TRILLION and about 70% of students graduating with a bachelor’s degree carry some form of student loan debt.  According to Forbes, the average graduate from the class of 2016 has over $37,000 of student loan debt.  These are crisis level figures, especially when […]

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2017-04-25T16:12:56+00:00 March 1, 2017 7:30 am|Categories: Debt, Featured|Tags: , , |0 Comments